Advanced Search

ENGLISH CONTENT

  • When birds meet the high-speed rail Español

    Adeline Marcos | January 08 2018 09:20

    If a high-speed train runs at 185 m/h through little urbanized areas, it is possible that some animals will be surprised in their path. This is the case of birds such as magpies, pigeons, crows or buzzards, whose death due to run over has not been scientifically analyzed or quantified so far. A study has now allowed obtaining the first estimates in Spain.

  • The Iberian brown bears do not descend from those fled from the north during the Ice Age Español

    Eva Rodríguez Nieto | December 26 2017 08:00

    According to the glacier refuges theory, after the last glaciations the bears of northern Europe sought shelter in the South. Researchers from A Coruña University reject this idea: they have reconstructed the colonization of brown bears in the Iberian Peninsula and have shown that the lineage of the Pleistocene bears was lost.

  • Images of the brain refute a theory of the 60s on the domain of language Español

    Laura Chaparro | December 19 2017 10:57

    A region of the brain that extends through both hemispheres, the planum temporale, is larger in the left than in the right hemisphere. The finding was linked in the 1960s with the hosting of language processing in the left hemisphere, but today European researchers show that this asymmetry is not a marker of language lateralization.

  • The Halloween asteroid prepares to return in 2018 Español

    Enrique Sacristán | December 19 2017 08:00

    There is one year to go until asteroid 2015 TB145 approaches Earth once again, just as it did in 2015 around the night of Halloween, an occasion which astronomers did not pass up to study its characteristics. This dark object measures between 625 and 700 metres, its rotation period is around three hours and, in certain lighting conditions, it resembles a human skull.

  • The evolution of the gene responsible for red meat to produce cancer has been revealed Español

    Eva Rodríguez Nieto | December 18 2017 08:12

    A sugar called Neu5Gc, present in red meat, some fish and dairy products, is related to the appearance of spontaneous tumors in humans. Researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, led by Spaniard David Álvarez Ponce, have analyzed the evolutionary history of the CMAH gene - which allows the synthesis of this sugar - and shown which groups of animals have lost the gene and therefore are more...

  • Action video games to fight dyslexia Español

    SINC | December 12 2017 09:30

    A study conducted by BCBL, the Basque research center, reveals that action video games improve visual attention and reading ability, two of the deficits suffered by people with dyslexia. The objective is to use the most useful elements of videogames in new software without violent connotations that help to treat this cognitive disorder.

  • Searching for the CRISPR Swiss-army knife Español

    Ana Hernando | December 04 2017 09:00

    Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, led by the Spanish Professor Guillermo Montoya, are investigating the molecular features of different molecular scissors of the CRISPR-Cas system to shed light on the so-called ‘Swiss-army knives’ of genome editing. Montoya’s research group has visualized the atomic structures of the Cpf1 and Cas9 proteins to analyse each of their properties and pecul...

  • The brain is still ‘connected’ during non-REM sleep Español

    Laura Chaparro | November 30 2017 13:17

    When we sleep, our organism goes through different phases of sleep, however the brain remains interconnected during non-REM sleep, which was thought not to happen. The finding by a European team of researchers has also made it possible to analyse the scientific basis of consciousness, an increasingly important field of neuroscience.

  • “Magnetism in graphene can be controlled with hydrogen atoms” Español

    Enrique Sacristán | November 30 2017 11:45

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, but no magnetic properties. This can be made up for with the help of the lightest element: hydrogen, which transfers its magnetic moment on coming into contact with graphene. This has been demonstrated by a team of European scientists coordinated by the physicist Iván Brihuega from the Autonomous University of Madrid.

  • The incredible journey of the first African tortoise that arrived in Europe Español

    Adeline Marcos | November 29 2017 10:30

    About 95 million years ago, a river turtle adapted to marine environments and made an extraordinary migration from the ancient continent of Gondwana, which grouped what is now Africa and South America, to Laurasia, the Northern continental mass of which Europe, Asia and North America were part. Its remains, found in the town of Algora in Guadalajara (Spain) and in Portugal, are the evidence of...