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Claude Levi- Strauss, the anthropologist who changed social sciences

Claude Levi- Strauss, the anthropologist who changed social sciences

Claude Levi- Strauss, the anthropologist who changed social sciences. / SINC

On November 28, 1908, Claude Lévi -Strauss was born, a French anthropologist who influenced generations of scientists and researchers by laying the foundations of modern anthropology .

A French national, born in Brussels, he was the father of the structuralist approach of social sciences and had a great influence in sociology, philosophy, history and theory of literature.

In 1934 he worked as a visiting professor of Philosophy at the University of São Paulo, where he analyzed indigenous cultures in Mato Grosso and Amazonia.

He served in the Maginot Line as a liaison officer and interpreter of English and, between bombs, he conceived structuralism, the science that would change forever the study of human subjects. "While we expected a battle that did not start, I observed in detail how, behind the apparent randomness of the beauty of a flower field, there was a strict organization in each of them," he said.

A few years later he was exiled to America, where he met R. Jakobson, whose linguistic structuralism influenced him decisively. Back in France in 1948, he worked as a professor of Comparative Religions at Sorbonne University and social anthropology at College of France.
In 1973 he became the first anthropologist to be part of the French Academy. He died in Paris at the age of 100.