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Cocodrilo
African crocodiles lived in Spain six million years ago
15 October 2020 8:00
Adeline Marcos

The crocodiles that inhabited the coasts of North Africa during the late Miocene period embarked on a journey to Europe across what is now the Mediterranean basin. This is confirmed by the analysis of the first fossils of the Crocodylus genus in the Iberian Peninsula, found in the Valencian site of Venta del Moro between 1995 and 2006, and which are now being described for the first time.

The last ‘caimans’ living in Spain
28 March 2017 10:30

Sixteen million years ago, the reptile Diplocynodon ratelii lived in wooded ecosystems among the lakes and pools of what we know today as Catalonia (Spain). Fossils found at the Els Casots site in the Vallès-Penedès Basin confirm not only that these are the most recent remains of the genus in the Iberian Peninsula, but also that temperatures at the time were higher than today’s.

Neanderthals manipulated the bodies of adults and children shortly after death
13 April 2015 10:05

Neanderthals from the French region of Poitou-Charentes cut, beat and fractured the bones of their recently deceased companions, as revealed by the fossil remains of two adults and a child found at the Marillac site. These manipulations have been observed at other Neanderthal sites, but scientists still do not know whether they did this for food or ceremony.

Palaeolithic humans from the north of Spain moved homes to dwellings with better logistics
27 January 2014 10:01

Scientists at the Cantabria International Institute for Prehistoric Research have traced the steps of the human beings that inhabited the region during the Palaeolithic era. Through computer programmes for geographical analysis, it is known that these nomads gradually abandoned high-altitude rocky shelters and caves to live on flatter plains.