If you are registered

You will not be able to connect if you exceed ten failed attempts.

If you are not yet registered

The SINC Agency offers different services depending on your profile.

Select yours:

Journalists Institutions
If you are registered

You will not be able to connect if you exceed ten failed attempts.

If you are not yet registered

The SINC Agency offers different services depending on your profile.

Select yours:

Journalists Institutions

Kubrick mocks nuclear war in Dr. Strangelove

Se cumplen 50 años del estreno de '¿Teléfono rojo? Volamos hacia Moscú'

Kubrick mocks nuclear war in Dr. Strangelove . / SINC

On January 29, 1964, Dr. Strangelove made its U.S. premiere. Stanley Kubrick's black comedy, starring Peter Sellers, played upon the real fears of a world terrified by the prospect of nuclear annihilation.

The film was loosely based on the Cold War thriller Red Alert, written by Peter George, and tells the story of how a group of military and the U.S. president try to stop a nuclear war after a U.S. colonel decides to launch an unauthorized, preemptive nuclear strike against the Soviet Union.

In the other hand, the USSR, according to an adviser of the U.S. president, has a machine called Doomsday, able to destroy humanity forever.

Kubrick masterfully uses the image, the color and the frames to give a feeling of anguish, drama and farce in this fierce critic, black and comical film of the Cold War at a time of global tension after the missile crisis in Cuba .

The bulk of Dr. Strangelove, in which Peter Sellers plays three roles, was nominated for four Academy Awards, and is regarded as a masterpiece in film history. The film is listed at No. 26 on the American Film Institute's "100 Years, 100 Movies."