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All information about: brain

  • “Until now, the study of consciousness had been seen as mystical or unscientific”

    Jesús Méndez | 19 July 2018 08:00

    Francis Crick, the co-discoverer of the DNA double helix, defined consciousness as the greatest unsolved problem in biology. The first major international conference of the Human Brain Project, held recently in Barcelona, has focused on the challenges and advances in its study. We have spoken with the local organizer of the conference.

  • This is how our brain finishes others´ sentences

    Dos personas durante una conversación

    SINC | 19 April 2018 10:00

    The Basque research centre BCBL has shown how we can anticipate a word before it is pronounced and thus complete a sentence without the need for the interlocutor to finish it. The experiment has proven that the ability to predict a term is related to the brain's ability to mentally construct sentences as they read or listen to them.

  • The businesswoman who wants to cure brains from home

    Ana Hernando | 29 March 2018 08:00

    Ana Maiques founded Neuroelectrics in 2011 with the goal of treating brain diseases in a non-invasive way, with a treatment unique to each patient. Today, her brain reading and electro-stimulation headgear is used to measure the fatigue of NASA pilots and being tested on patients in the US for the treatment of epilepsy. In addition, the company is exploring applications in neurodegenerative dis...

  • Yes! The brain can be trained to avoid dyslexia

    SINC | 26 February 2018 09:21

    The ability of the brain to synchronize with the tone and intonation of speech influences how language is processed. This concludes a study by the Basque research center BCBL, whose results could help design more effective activities to train the brain in order to avoid future disorders such as dyslexia.

  • ‘Waves’ of neural activity give new clues about Alzheimer’s

    Laura Chaparro | 05 September 2017 11:00

    While unconscious during deep sleep, millions of neurons’ activity travels across the cerebral cortex. This phenomenon, known as slow waves, is related to the consolidation of memory. The European project called SloW Dyn, led by Spanish scientists, has now revealed anomalies in this activity in mice displaying a decline similar to Alzheimer’s.

  • Our brains synchronise during a conversation

    SINC | 18 July 2017 10:00

    The rhythms of brainwaves between two people taking part in a conversation begin to match each other. This is the conclusion of a study published in the magazine ‘Scientific Reports’, led by the Basque research centre BCBL. According to scientists, this interbrain synchrony may be a key factor in understanding language and interpersonal communication.

  • Tell me what languages you know and I’ll tell you how you read

    SINC | 08 May 2017 09:30

    The languages we speak influence several factors that we rely on for our ability to read, such as visual attention and phonological processes. So concludes a new study carried out at the BCBL research centre in the Basque country. The findings could have implications in teaching and in the diagnosis of dyslexia and other reading problems. 

  • Microbubbles and ultrasound open the blood–brain barrier to administer drugs

    Enrique Sacristán | 14 November 2016 09:20

    The impassable blood–brain barrier prevents microorganisms from entering our brain, however it also blocks medicines that could help treat Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. Now, a Spanish physicist and other researchers at the University of Columbia (USA) have succeeded in embedding these substances in tiny lipid bubbles, in such a way that ultrasound can be used to...

  • Bilingual brains activate different networks when reading opaque and transparent languages

    SINC | 24 October 2016 08:43

    Three Spanish researchers have discovered that bilinguals use different neural networks to read languages that are pronounced as they are written – such as the Basque language – from those in which this correspondence does not exist, like English. The results are valuable for teaching reading to adults and children.

  • First direct evidence for ultra-fast responses in human amygdala to fear

    Imagen cerebral en la que aparecen coloreadas la amígdala (azul) y el hipocampo (amarillo). / Stephan Moratti.

    UCM | 13 June 2016 17:00

    For the first time, an international team of scientists lead by researchers from the Campus de Excelencia Internacional Moncloa (UCM-UPM) has shown that the amygdala in the human brain is able to detect possible threats in the visual environment at ultra-fast time scales. By measuring the electrical activity in the amygdala of patients that had been implanted with electrodes in order to better...

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