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Jurassic dinosaurs trotted between Africa and Europe
22 October 2019 9:30
Adeline Marcos

Dinosaur footprints found in several European countries, very similar to others in Morocco, suggest that they could have been dispersed between the two continents by land masses separated by a shallow sea more than 145 million years ago.

Megacities at high risk due to climate change
12 March 2018 9:10
Eva Rodríguez

Several coastal cities of the USA and China are in danger due to sea-level rise that will take place if adaptation measures against climate change are not taken. A study led by the Basque Center for Climate Change on the 120 largest cities in the world warns of the fate that will run large cities such as New Orleans, Canton, Shanghai, Boston and New York.

The first European sea turtles became extinct due to changing sea levels
16 March 2015 8:38

In Jaen in 2009 a team of scientists found the remains of what was, until then, the oldest turtle species in southern Europe at 160 million years old. But by reinterpreting the fossils, a Spanish researcher has proved that it is not a new species, but a group of very diverse turtles in Europe during the Jurassic Period, which disappeared due to changing sea levels.

Mediterranean meteorological tide has increased by over a millimetre a year since 1989
18 November 2014 10:24

A new database developed by the University of Cantabria provides data on sea level variation due to atmospheric changes in the south of Europe between 1948 and 2009. Over the last two decades sea levels have increased in the Mediterranean basin.