Suscríbete al boletín semanal

Suscríbete para recibir cada semana el boletín SINC con los contenidos más relevantes y no te pierdas nada de la actualidad científica.

Suscríbete al boletín semanal
If you are registered

You will not be able to connect if you exceed ten failed attempts.

If you are not yet registered

The SINC Agency offers different services depending on your profile.

Select yours:

Journalists Institutions
If you are registered

You will not be able to connect if you exceed ten failed attempts.

If you are not yet registered

The SINC Agency offers different services depending on your profile.

Select yours:

Journalists Institutions
Calcium isotope holds the secret to the mass of neutrinos
11 April 2016 8:19
SINC

Scientists around the world are being kept in suspense by the negligible mass of neutrinos, subatomic particles that could be matter and antimatter at the same time. Now, researchers from the University of Tokyo, in collaboration with a Spanish physicist, have used one of the world’s most powerful computers to analyse a special decay of calcium-48, whose life, which lasts trillions of years, depends on the unknown mass of neutrinos. This advance will facilitate the detection of this rare decay in underground laboratories.

Basketball games mimic nature
29 March 2016 11:01
SINC

Behind the apparent randomness of a basketball game, a process of self-organisation is actually taking place amid the teams. The interactions between team mates and opponents are constantly influencing each other while the game itself allows for creative behaviours to emerge. This phenomenon, detected by Spanish researchers after analysing over 6,000 NBA games, resembles the way in which living things must continually evolve in order to survive in nature.

New LED with luminescent proteins
7 January 2016 9:15
SINC

Scientists from Germany and Spain have discovered a way to create a BioLED by packaging luminescent proteins in the form of rubber. This innovative device gives off a white light which is created by equal parts of blue, green and red rubber layers covering one LED, thus rendering the same effect as with traditional inorganic LEDs but at a lower cost.

Heating can damage the artistic heritage of churches
30 March 2015 8:52
SINC

The antiquated heating systems in many Spanish churches create abrupt variations in temperature and humidity which can negatively affect the conservation of its artistic heritage, especially in tall ceiling areas. Also, as the heat rises, it takes time for the parishioners below to feel comfortable after the heating systems are turned on. These are the findings of an analysis conducted on a church in Madrid by researchers from the Institute of Geosciences (UCM-CSIC).

Lead islands in a sea of graphene magnetise the material of the future
15 December 2014 17:00
SINC

Researchers in Spain have discovered that if lead atoms are intercalated on a graphene sheet, a powerful magnetic field is generated by the interaction of the electrons’ spin with their orbital movement. This property could have implications in spintronics, an emerging technology promoted by the European Union to create advanced computational systems.

Pressing the accelerator on quantum robotics
2 October 2014 9:00
SINC

Quantum computing will allow for the creation of powerful computers, but also much smarter and more creative robots than conventional ones. This was the conclusion arrived at by researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) and Austria, who have confirmed that quantum tools help robots learn and respond much faster to the stimuli around them.

An anomaly in satellites’ flybys confounds scientists
18 September 2014 9:28
SINC

When space probes, such as Rosetta and Cassini, fly over certain planets and moons, in order to gain momentum and travel long distances, their speed changes slightly for an unknown reason. A Spanish researcher has now analysed whether or not a hypothetical gravitomagnetic field could have an influence. However, other factors such as solar radiation, tides, or even relativistic effects or dark matter could be behind this mystery.

The scientific explanation of why beer overflows when a one bottle is bumped against another
20 January 2014 11:22
UC3M

Scientists at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) reveal the physical phenomenon that explains beer’s rapid transformation from a liquid to a foamy state as the result of an impact. This research has applications in the area of naval engineering or in studies related to the prediction of gases in volcanic eruptions.

Spider silk ties scientists up in knots
20 January 2014 10:49
SINC

Two years ago, researchers from Iowa State University (USA) published a study which concluded that spider silk conducts heat as well as metals. Now, a team from the University of the Basque Country (Spain) has repeated the experiment and the results throw this discovery into question. This has reaffirmed the need to validate scientific findings before proclaiming their validity in the press.

Controversy over the use of Roman ingots to investigate dark matter and neutrinos
28 November 2013 11:00
SINC

The properties of these lead bricks recovered from ancient shipwrecks are ideal for experiments in particle physics. Scientists from the CDMS dark matter detection project in Minnesota (USA) and from the CUORE neutrino observatory at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy have begun to use them, but archaeologists have raised alarm about the destruction and trading of cultural heritage that lies behind this. The journal ‘Science’ has expressed this dilemma formulated by two Spanish researchers in the United Kingdom.